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Amateur Radio Club

...WH6CZB | HONOLULU, HI | USA | GRID BL11...

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Club Repeaters...as of May 7, 2016

Click Here to see a map of our Club Repeater locations.


146.880- (PL 88.5)Repeater: Diamond Head
The WH6CZB repeater operating on 146.280/146.880 MHz is located at about the 550-foot elevation of the northeast flank atop Diamond Head Crater. This is the clubs flagship repeater, as it serves all of Honolulu, including parts of Leeward, Central, Windward Oahu and the western half of Molokai. Many transient and local hams use this repeater for general communications. Also, this is the primary public service event repeater for most events in Waikiki and the Honolulu Marathon. This repeater when linked simulcasts on 146.980 Downtown, 146.760 Peacock Flats, 444.325 Windward, 147.060 State DH and the EARC 146.800 Maunakapu/146.660 Olomana repeaters.
444.500+ Repeater: Dimond Head
This Repeater is off the air. A new home is being sought for it.
146.800- (PL 88.5) Repeater: Maunakapu
The WH6CZB repeater operating on 146.200/146.800 MHz is located 2,400 feet atop the Waianae mountain range at a site called Mauna Kapu (translated into English from Hawaiian: "Forbidden Mountain"). While this repeater serves the entire Leeward Coast, Ewa, Kapolei, and Waipahu areas, it covers an area all the way east to Kaimuki. When propagation on 2 meters is booming, amateur stations along the Kona Coast of the Big Island can reach the repeater. This site is off the electric grid and run entirely on solar power, the site has internet linking and allstar capability as private nodes 1061 VHF, 1062 UHF. There is also an Echolink Node at this location connected daily to the UHF 1062 node, WH6CZB-R
444.100+ (PL 88.5) Repeater: Maunakapu
The WH6CZB repeater operating on 449.100/444.100 MHz is located 2,400 feet atop the Waianae mountain range at a site called Mauna Kapu (translated into English from Hawaiian: "Forbidden Mountain"). While this repeater serves the entire Leeward Coast, Ewa, Kapolei, and Waipahu areas, it covers an area all the way east to Kaimuki. This site is off the electric grid and run entirely on solar power, the site has internet linking and allstar capability as private nodes 1061 VHF, 1062 UHF.
146.660-(PL88.5) Repeater: Olomana
The WH6CZB repeater operating on 146.060/146.660 MHz is the primary two meter repeater serving the Waimanalo, Kailua, and Kaneohe areas of Oahu. the site has internet linking and allstar capability as private nodes 1065 VHF, 1066 UHF.
444.15+ (PL88.5) Repeater:
The WH6CZB repeater operating on 444.150/449.150 MHz is the primary 70 centimetre repeater serving the Waimanalo, Kailua, and Kaneohe areas of Oahu. the site has internet linking and allstar capability as private nodes 1065 VHF, 1066 UHF.
146.640-(PL103.5) Repeater: Laie
The WH6CZB repeater operating on 146.040/146.640 MHz is the primary two meter repeater serving the Laie and Kahuku area of Oahu. This repeater provides excellent coverage from Turtle Bay, Kahuku tO Kahana Valley, along Oahu's North East Shore. This is the next site that will receive internet linking in the near future.

Allstar Linking Project:

Click here for EARC Allmon Page, runs only with google chrome browser.

DEM Repeaters:

146.760- Repeater:
The KH6OCD repeater operating on 146.160/146.760 MHz is the primary two meter repeater serving Oahu's North Shore from Sunset Beach to Kaena Point. Located on a mountaintop called Peacock Flats, this repeater provides excellent coverage all along Oahu's North West Shore.
146.980-(PL88.5) Repeater:
The KH6OCD repeater operating on 146.380/146.980 MHz is a local area repeater serving downtown Honolulu and surrounding communities. It is located on the rooftop of the Honolulu Municipal Building at 650 S. King St. This repeater simulcasts on UHF, on 448.700- MHz.

Repeater Regulations

  1. Monitor the repeater to become familiar with any peculiarities in its operation. This is a good suggestion but don't be afraid to jump in and "get your feet wet" and enjoy the fun.
  2. To initiate contact, simply indicate that you are on frequency. For example, "This is WH6CZB monitoring." Or, "This is WH6CZB listening." It is very likely that you will get a return call.
  3. Identify legally. You must identify at the termination of your transmission and at least once each ten minutes. This also includes "kerchunking", which is not desirable practice and in fact is illegal operation. Also the practice of keying the repeater, without identifying, after a QSO has terminated to show a final acknowledgement is illegal as well.
  4. In calling another station, it is conventional to state the station to be called first, then your call, e.g., "WH6CZB, this is KH6ABC calling."
  5. Pause for the courtesy tone after each transmission. If the courtesy tone is not present, pause anyway. This allows someone with emergency traffic; or someone wishing to make a call on the repeater; or other operators wishing to enter the exchange to be heard.
  6. When you have an emergency and need to use the repeater, and it is in use, wait for a pause between exchanges and then use the pro-words "BREAK BREAK" and identify yourself. The other stations should acknowledge and stand by for you to complete your emergency transmission. On the repeater, the word "BREAK" should NOT be used to just enter the conversation.
  7. When you wish to join an ongoing conversation, wait for the pause between exchanges and then say, your callsign--"KH6ABC", or your suffix--"ABC". Then wait for one of the other stations to acknowledge you.
  8. Keep your transmissions short and thoughtful, especially during the morning, noon, and evening drive times when more operators may need to use the repeater.
  9. Remember, our club has several two-meter repeaters. If one repeater is active and you need to contact someone, or you expect someone to contact you, try the other repeater. With the new rigs having scan capabilities it is easy to monitor several frequencies at the "same" time. Choosing a simplex frequency among friends has gained some popularity. This practice frees-up the repeaters as well as making your conversation a bit more private like
  10. If your conversation is going to be long and the other station is within direct contact range, go to a simplex frequency. It is "more" like a private conversation than what the repeater produces. This also permits other stations, who require the repeater to make a contact.
  11. Use the minimum amount of power necessary to maintain communications. However, you deserve to have a clear communication. If possible, don't subject your contact to a noisy transmission if you can clear it up with a little more power. Some communications are marginal only because one operator likes to use the absolute minimum power.
  12. Don't break into a contact unless you have something to add. You wouldn't walk down a street and just enter into a group's conversation just because you heard them say something that reminded you of a "cute" story.
  13. Respond to calls for assistance or just conversation. Our repeater is known as a friendly repeater. Let's keep it that way.

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